Sleeping Bags for Children

When it comes to the time to buy your little one(s) a sleeping bag of their own it can be tempting to dust off that old one of yours which has been sitting in the loft gathering dust. If they are just heading up the road for a sleepover in a house then you may get away with it but otherwise you are asking for camp trip disaster as they shiver their way through each and every night.

 

The main thing which ensures a cosy sleeping bag, assuming you have bought something of decent quality, is the amount of spare space within it. You are the heat source and the sleeping bag is the means by which that heat is retained or not. A small child inside an adult's sleeping bag will have more space than otherwise and no chance of their little body heating the whole thing efficiently.

One great bonus with kids sleeping bags is the relatively cheap price.  Anyone with children can tell you that kid size stuff, which normally uses a fraction of the material when compared to the equivalent adult article, annoyingly and illogically has double the price tag. It is rather refreshing to find this is not the case with sleeping bags and 3-season, synthetic fill children's sleeping bags are easily found for under £30 and often well under, depending on the make.

 

The main difference between an adult and a child sleeping bag is of course the length and overall size. This in itself is one of the things which puts many parents off – 'won't we have to keep shelling out for a new sleeping bag every time he/she grows another few inches?' The answer you will be happy to hear is no. A common feature on children's sleeping bags is an extension section which allows you to zip off the bottom and add a longer one when needed.

 

The other differences in a child's sleeping bag have a variety of purposes which include practicality, increased comfort or something which is solely designed to make the bag more appealing to a child.

Many children's sleeping bags are given extra protection through increased water resistance on their outer shells for the inevitable spills that may take place. Additionally, many come with a sleeve on the underside into which a sleeping pad can be slotted to keep it firmly in place throughout the night no matter how much they wriggle around. Sometimes there are loops for fixing instead.

 

Other common features on children's sleeping bags are integral pockets for stowing away any little treasures or for keeping such practical things like a torch within easy reach and pillow pockets.

Sleeping bags for children often come in a far wider range of colours and designs than adult sleeping bags and sometimes even the inner lining has some sort of pattern. There are even companies which will personalise sleeping bags for children.

 

Otherwise the choices within the sleeping bags for children range are the same as for adults. Synthetic or down fill bags are available although the vast majority of kid's bags are synthetic fill and it can be far harder to source a wide selection of down-filled bags. Comfort ratings and season ratings are also the same as is the choice of shape – mummy or rectangular – although there are a few hybridised mixes available too. Although mummy bags are usually the warmer option because they reduce unfilled space, not all children like the confinement of a mummy style sleeping bag so it might be worth bearing this in mind.

 

Your final consideration when buying a child's sleeping bag is whether or not to get a liner. Liners help keep the inside of the bag free of dirt and smells and so reduce the need for such regular sleeping bag washing which in turn could damage the bag and reduce its insulating properties. Liners are available in sizes to match children's sleeping bags.